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The wrestler then places the opponent's far leg in the knee-pit of the near leg, finishing the submission by putting the opponent's ankle on top of their own ankle, rolling both onto their bellies, and pushing back with the wrestler's knees.

It is used by Cody as the American Nightmare. Also and originally known as a "scorpion hold". This move is usually executed on a wrestler lying flat on their back.

The wrestler executing the move will step between the opponent's legs, grab both of them, and twist them into a knot around their leg.

Holding the opponent's legs in place, the wrestler then steps over the opponent and turns them over, applying pressure the whole way to cause pain to the knee and legs.

While applying the pressure to the legs, the wrestler executing the move has a variety of positions they can be in; however, the two most common involve the wrestler standing and leaning back while applying the move or sitting on their opponent's back.

The move was invented by Riki Choshu but was made famous in the United States by Bret "Hitman" Hart , who gave it the name Sharpshooter to suit his stage name.

The move was also popularized in the States by Sting , who called the hold the Scorpion Death Lock and applied the hold from a seated position. The Rock also used this move as his signature submission move by the name Sharpshooter.

The only difference between Sting's "Scorpion Death Lock" and the current "Sharpshooter" is which leg the pressure is on, as Sting's targets the right leg and the "Sharpshooter" targets the left leg.

For this variation, the wrestler steps between the opponent's legs with one of their own and crosses the opponent's legs so that their near leg's ankle is in the far leg's knee pit.

The wrestler then does not mount the opponent, but instead remains to the side of the opponent and pushes to cause pain.

The wrestler using this move stands over the opponent who is lying face up on the mat, and grasps a leg of the opponent.

The wrestler then turns degrees over the leg, twisting it inward. A wrestler can repeatedly step over the leg and around again to twist the knee and ankle joints even more.

The anaconda vise is a compression choke. The wrestler wraps their arms around the head and one arm of the opponent and squeezes, choking the opponent.

It is considered legal in professional wrestling, although it is a chokehold. This submission hold was invented by Hiroyoshi Tenzan.

Also known as an arm-trap triangle choke. The vise is done from a position in which the wrestler and the opponent are seated on the mat facing each other.

The wrestler sits on one side of the opponent, encircles the opponent in a headlock position using their near arm, and grabs the opponent's near wrist, bending the arm upwards.

Then, the wrestler maneuvers their other arm through the "hole" created by the opponent's bent wrist, locks their hand upon their own wrist, and pulls the opponent forward, causing pressure on the opponent's arm and neck.

There are also variations of the anaconda vise that are combined with a straight jacket choke , called Anaconda Max and a cobra clutch , called Anaconda Cross.

These variations are also invented by Tenzan himself. Also called an arm triangle, this choke sees the wrestler wrapping their arm from under the opponent's nearest arm pit and across the chest.

The maneuver can be used as an uncommon submission maneuver, such as used by Braun Strowman , or a transitioning hold, usually to fall backwards into an arm triangle reverse STO.

Austin Aries uses a bridging variation called Last Chancery as one of his finishing moves. The wrestler pushes their standing or seated opponent into the turnbuckle and extends their leg, choking their opponent while using the top two ropes for support.

This attack is illegal and results in a wrestler's disqualification, should the move not be broken by a count of five. For some flexible wrestlers, a variation of this move can be performed while standing in the performance of a standing split.

Another variant performed by Dana Brooke is done in a handstand position while she chokes the opponent with one foot. This neck lock sees a wrestler sit above a fallen opponent and wrap their legs around the opponent in the form of the figure-four , with one leg crossing under the opponent's chin and under the wrestler's other leg the wrestler squeezes and chokes the opponent.

In an illegal version of the hold, best described as a hanging figure-four necklock, the wrestler stands on top of the turnbuckle, wraps their legs around the head of the opponent who has their back turned against the turnbuckle in the figure-four and falls backwards, choking the opponent.

In most matches the hold would have to be released before a five count. WWE wrestler Carmella uses an inverted variant of this hold as her finisher where she uses her shin to choke the opponent instead, making it resemble a gogoplata.

This variant is called the Code of Silence. Usually executed from a " rubber guard ," where the legs are held very high, against the opponent's upper back.

The wrestler then slips one foot in front of the opponent's head and under their chin, locks their hands behind the opponent's head, and chokes the opponent by pressing their shin or instep against the opponent's trachea.

Wrestlers use a modified version, where they only push the shin into the throat in exactly the same manner instead of grabbing their toes and pulling towards themselves.

The Undertaker used this as his submission finisher, calling it Hell's Gate. The attacking wrestler tucks the opponent's head underneath their armpit and wraps one arm around the neck so that the forearm is pressed against the throat, as in a front chancery.

The attacking wrestler then wraps their legs around the opponent's midsection with a body scissors and arches backwards, pulling the opponent's head forward, stretching the torso and the neck.

It can be performed from standing, sitting, or prone positions. Kyle O'Reilly uses this move as a signature.

Also known as a cobra choke or a kata ha jime a term borrowed from judo , this hold sees the wrestler put the opponent in a half nelson with one arm and grab the opponent's neck the other, sometimes while adding body scissors.

This move was popularized by Taz , who used it as a finishing move, calling it the Tazmission or Tazzmission. The opponent lies face down on the mat.

The wrestler lies face up and slightly to the side of the opponent. The wrestler hooks their far leg across the neck of the opponent, then hooks their hands behind the opponent's head, having one arm pass over their own leg and the other under.

The wrestler then pulls backwards with their arms and pushes forward with their leg, causing pressure. The name comes from its inventor's name, Koji Kanemoto.

Another variation sees the attacker performing a reverse STO, then locking the regular Koji clutch in, but crossing their legs in a modified figure-four headscissors.

With the opponent hung over the second rope, facing the outside of the ring, the attacking wrestler hooks their left or right leg over the back of the opponent's neck.

The attacking wrestler then pulls the second rope upwards, compressing the opponent's throat between the rope and attacking wrestler's leg, choking them.

This move is illegal due to usage of the ring ropes, and results in a disqualification for the wrestler should they not release the hold before a count of five.

In this variation of the triangle choke , the wrestler sits behind a seated opponent. The wrestler places one of their legs under the chin of the opponent and pushes up.

The wrestler then takes hold of their ankle with their opposite arm and pulls their leg up. The wrestler then places their free leg on the instep of the leg which is already being used to choke the opponent.

The wrestler finally takes their free arm, hooks the opponent's arm which is in the vise, and holds their opposite leg from the knee. The pressure is applied once the wrestler compresses their knees together.

The pentagram choke creates a complete vise around the opponent's neck, and its name comes from using five sides, whereas the triangle choke only uses three.

The wrestler grabs their opponent's throat with one hand and squeezes tightly. A "goozle" is a single arm choke held briefly before performing a chokeslam.

Innovated by Ed Lewis , the wrestler begins positioned behind their opponent. The wrestler then wraps their arm around the opponent's neck, pressing the biceps against one side of the neck and the inner bone of the forearm against the other side.

The neck is squeezed inside the arm very tightly. Additional pressure can be applied by grabbing the left shoulder with the right hand, or grabbing the biceps of the left arm near the elbow , then using the left hand to push the opponent's head towards the crook of the right elbow.

Also known as a "buffalo sleeper", this choke sees the wrestler kneeling behind a seated opponent before grabbing hold of one of the opponent's arms, bending it backwards overhead, and locking the opponent's wrist into the attacker's armpit.

The wrestler then wraps their free arm under the opponent's chin as in a sleeper hold, puts their other arm through the arch created by the opponent's trapped arm, and locks their hands.

The wrestler then squeezes the opponent's neck, causing pressure. The move was invented by Hiroyoshi Tenzan. Also known as an "arm-trap half nelson sleeper", the wrestler stands behind the opponent and uses one arm to place the opponent in a half nelson.

The wrestler then uses their free arm to pull the opponent's arm the same arm to which the wrestler is applying the half nelson across the face of the opponent.

The wrestler then locks their hand to their wrist behind the opponent's neck to make the opponent submit or lose consciousness as the carotid artery is cut off.

This submission was used as a "finishing" maneuver by a number of wrestlers over the years, including Sgt. Kazuchika Okada uses this finishing move as Money Clip.

With the opponent lying face down, the wrestler sits beside the opponent, facing the same way, locks on the cobra clutch, and then arches their legs and back, bending the opponent's torso and neck upwards.

The attacking wrestler stands behind the opponent who is either sitting or lying face down, then pulls the opponent into an inverted facelock , often hooking the opponent's near arm with their free arm.

The attacker then pulls backwards and up, wrenching the opponent's neck and spine. If the opponent is sitting, the wrestler can press their knee into the opponent's back, adding pressure.

Low Ki once used a version from a back-mount position called the Dragon Clutch. Sanada used this hold while applying with bodyscissors as the Skull End.

Drew Gulak uses a kneeling variation of the submission. The wrestler wraps their arm around the opponents neck performing a sleeper hold, then climbs to the second rope and hangs the opponent by the neck.

A grounded version of a sleeper hold with an added body scissors that is derived from martial arts and more recently mixed martial arts.

It is also used by Karrion Kross as the Kross Jacket. Also known as a "Japanese stranglehold" goku-raku gatame , "criss-cross stranglehold", "cut-throat", and "cross-armed choke".

The wrestler sits on the back of an opponent who is lying face down on the mat. The wrestler then grabs hold of the opponent's wrists and crosses their arms under their chin.

The wrestler then pulls back on the arms, causing pressure. The move was invented and popularized by Jinsei Shinzaki. The attacking wrestler stands behind an opponent and reaches around the opponent's neck with one arm.

The wrestler then extends a thumb and thrusts it into the windpipe or carotid artery of the opponent, cutting off their air or blood supply.

The former would not be acceptable in traditional professional wrestling, as all chokeholds that cut off the windpipe are not allowed in the sport.

The wrestler darts their hand under an opponent's chin and grabs ahold of a pressure point above the throat, squeezing the nerve.

This cuts off the air supply and the opponent fades out, yet this is not considered an air choke as it is not squeezing the windpipe.

This hold is unique in that it can be used as a sleeper-like submission or, should the "unconscious" opponent end up lying on their back, a pinfall.

Used as a finisher by Haku. The wrestler grabs hold of one of their opponent's arms, wraps their legs around the opponent's throat and arm in a figure-four and squeezes.

Different promotions have different rules regarding the legality of this maneuver. The justification for its legality is that, like a head scissors, it uses the legs rather than the hands to perform the "choke"; also, it does not crush the windpipe strangulation ; rather, it compresses the carotid arteries jugulation.

Also known as a "neck-hanging tree" a wrestler grasps an opponent's neck with both hands, lifts them up, and then slams them.

This is a transition hold for moves such as a two-handed chokeslam and a chokebomb. Some holds are meant neither to pin an opponent, nor weaken them nor force them to submit, but are intended to set up the opponent for another attack.

The wrestler takes hold of the opponent's arm or wrist and turns around completely while twisting the arm over the wrestler's head, resulting in the opponent's arm being wrenched.

This may lead to an armbar , a wrist lock , the wrestler pulling the opponent onto their shoulders in a fireman's carry , an Irish whip , or a short-arm maneuver, such as a clothesline.

Also referred to as a reverse nelson and double underhook. The wrestler and the opponent begin facing one another, with the opponent bent over.

The wrestler approaches the opponent and reaches under the opponent's shoulders, then threads their arms up and around the opponent's torso, with their hands meeting in the middle of the opponent's back or neck essentially an inverted full nelson hold , and tucking the opponents head in their armpit.

The hold itself can be and sometimes is used as a submission move, but it is more commonly used as a transition hold to set up another move such as a suplex , a DDT , a facebuster , or a powerbomb.

One wrestler who does use the move as a submission is Matt Hardy ; his Ice Pick maneuver sees him lock the double underhook on an opponent while simultaneously trapping the opponent in a bodyscissors lock.

Similar to a double underhook, but only one arm is underhooked and the head of the opponent is placed into a front facelock. It can be transitioned into a DDT, suplex, etc.

Used by Yoshi-Hashi as Butterfly Lock. The wrestler stands in front of and facing a bent over opponent and places them in a gutwrench waistlock or a standing headscissors.

The wrestler then flips the opponent up and over so the opponent is lying face up on the back of the wrestler. The wrestler then moves their hands to the upper arm or wrists of the opponent, holding them in position, and spreading the arms of the opponent as though they were being crucified , hence the name.

This is often a set-up for a crucifix powerbomb or a spinning crucifix toss. The wrestler stands in front of and with their back to a standing opponent.

The wrestler then leans backwards and seizes the opponent around the waist, pulling them forward and upwards so they are lying across the shoulder of the opponent, facing downwards.

The wrestler then takes hold of the upper arms or wrists of the opponent and spreads them, holding the opponent in place. A transitional hold in which an attacking wrestler hoists an opponent up onto they shoulders so that they are both facing in the same direction.

It is often used to set up various drops and slams in singles competition. However it is more often used in a double team maneuver, known as a " doomsday device ", wherein another wrestler uses flying attacks to knock opponents off the shoulders of the wrestler.

Like many transition holds, the defensive wrestler often uses the position to perform a variety of counter moves, most notably the victory roll.

Another counter of the electric chair position is the wrestler twisting over the opponent's shoulders so now they are facing the opposite direction, and from that position, the wrestler would backflip to hit a hurricanrana.

The wrestler bends over with the opponent standing to the side of the wrestler. The wrestler then pulls the opponent's arm over their far shoulder and distributes the wrestler's body over their shoulders while having the other hand between and holding onto one of the opponent's legs and stands up.

The opponent is draped face-down across the wrestler's shoulders, with the wrestler's arms wrapped around from behind. It is a key component of several throws , drops and slams.

The wrestler stands face-to-face with the opponent, ducks, hooks one of their arms over the opponent's shoulder if seizing the opponent's left shoulder, they hook with their right, or opposite if sides are reversed , swings under the opponent's armpit, then around and over the opponent's back, so that they faces the same way as the opponent.

Also known as Military press. A transition lift to perform many throws , drops and slams. It became a popular technique for larger and stronger wrestlers as the lift is seen to emphasize their height and power.

A set-up for many throws and slams, this sees the attacking wrestler put a bent at the waist opponent to one side of them, reach the near hand around, and lock their hands around the opponent's waist.

A common move out of this transition can be a powerbomb or a suplex. The move used to trick an unsuspecting opponent. The wrestler sits down, crosses their legs, tucks their head into their chest and wraps one arm around their ankle so they are effectively rolled into a ball.

The wrestler then extends their remaining arm between their legs and then waits. The opponent, ostensibly confused, normally takes the offered hand, at which point the wrestler rolls forward and into an armlock.

The wrestler sits on top of the opponent's torso, facing their head, with their legs on either side. When the opponent's head is facing the ground the position is referred to as back mount.

Various strikes, such as closed-fist punches, elbows, open-hand slaps, open-hand palm strikes, and hammer-fists to the opponent's head are often performed from this position.

Closed fist punches are legal in WWE , but in other promotions, referees will tell wrestlers to watch the hand due to closed-fist punches being illegal.

Palm strikes, slaps, and elbow strikes can be used in place of punches. The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward.

One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked. Then the wrestler lifts the opponent up over their shoulder.

From here many throws , drops and slams can be performed. A double pumphandle exists, where the second arm is not hooked, it is also pulled under and between the opponent's legs.

A rope-hung move sees the opponent trapped either over the top rope or between the top and second rope. Facing the opponent, the wrestler reaches between the opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm.

The wrestler lifts their opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body. The scoop is also called the scoop powerslam where the wrestler attacks puts their hand in middle of the opponent's legs and turns them.

Goldust , Randy Orton and Samoa Joe mainly use it and use it in a fraction of a second. The wrestler approaches the opponent who is lying face-down.

The wrestler traps one of the opponent's ankles between their thighs as seen primarily before applying an STF.

From that point, the wrestler can apply other holds to the opponent, such as a fujiwara armbar or a three-quarter facelock. The wrestler stands facing the opponent.

The wrestler bends the opponent down so they are bent facing in front on the wrestler's body. The wrestler reaches around the opponent's body with their arms and lifts them up, spinning the opponent in front of the wrestler's body, often to deliver a slam or most commonly a " tilt-a-whirl backbreaker " or a " pendulum backbreaker ".

Usually performed on a charging opponent, this can also be a transition hold for counterattacks that sees the wrestler hit many throws and drops like a DDT or headscissors takedown.

This move is achieved when a wrestler wraps a forward-facing opponent's legs around their waist either by standing behind an opponent who is lying face-first on the mat or by catching a charging opponent , applying a gutwrench hold and lifting the opponent up off the ground into the air, then either continuing lifting and falling backwards to wheelbarrow suplex , or forcing the opponent back down to the mat to hit a wheelbarrow facebuster.

This can also can be a transition hold for counterattacks that see the wrestler who is being wheelbarrowed hit many throws and drops , like a DDT or a bulldog and rolling pin combinations.

The collar-and-elbow tie-up is one of the mainstays of professional wrestling, and many matches are begun with this move. It is a neutral move, but it easily transitions for either wrestler to a position of dominance.

It is performed by approaching the opponent and putting one hand on the back of the opponent's neck while holding the elbow of the opponent's arm that is holding their own neck.

It can also be used to immobilize an opponent by pushing them to the ground. The wrestler takes hold of a supine opponent's legs and pivots rapidly, elevating the opponent and swinging the opponent in a circle.

The wrestler may release the hold in mid-air or simply slow until the back of the opponent returns to the ground.

This move commonly sees an attacking wrestler dive over an opponent who is facing them, usually bent over forwards, catching the opponent in a waistlock from behind and landing back-first behind the opponent.

From that position the wrestler rolls forward into a sitting position, pulling the opponent over backwards and down to the mat so that they lands on their back into a sitout pin position.

While being held on the shoulders of an attacking wrestler in a position where the opponent is straddling the head of the attacking wrestler while facing in the other direction.

This move can be used as a counter from various powerbombs and other moves such as a Gory bomb. The move was used by Melina as the Last Call.

This involves a wrestler suspending an opponent upside down on a turnbuckle, with the opponent's back being up against it. To do this the opponent's legs are then hooked under the top ropes, leaving the opponent facing the attacking wrestler, upside down.

Often an attacking wrestler will choke , kick , or stomp the opponent until the referee uses up their five count. No leaks. Calm down, there's a million other places you can find them.

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Aj Lee Camel Toe Video

Kaitlyn vs. AJ Lee - WWE Divas Championship Match: SmackDown, Aug. 2, 2013

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Aj Lee Finished

The wrestler then reaches forwards and applies a chinlock as in a standard camel clutch, leaning backwards to apply pressure to the upper back and arm.

Also known as a rear chinlock, the attacking wrestler crouches down behind a sitting opponent and places their knee into the opponent's upper back, then reaches forward and grasps the opponent's chin with both hands.

The attacker then either pulls straight back on the chin or wrenches it to the side. A maneuver similar to a neck wrench where the wrestler faces a bent-over opponent.

The wrestler then places their own spare arm under the other hand and over the opponent's back to lock in the hold, compressing the opponent's neck.

The attacking wrestler can then arch backwards, pulling the opponent's head downward. This move sees the attacker kneel behind a sitting opponent and wrap around one arm under the opponent's chin and lock their hands.

As with a sleeper hold, this move can also be performed from a standing position. Another variation of this hold, referred to as a bridging reverse chinlock, sees the attacking wrestler crouch before a face-down opponent and wrap around one arm under the opponent's chin and lock their hands before applying a bridge.

Also known as the " iron claw ", the claw involves the attacker gripping the top of the head of the opponent with one hand and squeezing the tips of their fingers into the opponent's skull, thereby applying five different points of pressure.

This can be transitioned into a clawhold STO or iron claw slam. There is also double-handed version sometimes known as a head vise. The wrestler performing the hold approaches their opponent from behind and grips their head with both hands.

While in the vise, the wrestler can control their opponent by squeezing the temples and bring them down to a seated position where more pressure can be exerted.

It was invented and used by Baron von Raschke , as well as many members of the Von Erich family , and Blackjack Mulligan.

A maneuver which, when applied correctly against an individual, is purported to cause intense, legitimate pain.

The hold is applied when the aggressor places their middle and ring fingers into the opponent's mouth, sliding them under the tongue and jabbing into the soft tissue found at the bottom of the mouth.

Similar to a clawhold, the attacking wrestler applies a nerve lock onto the opponent's shoulder by using their hands and fingers to dig in and compress the top of the shoulder.

Usually performed with the attacking wrestler standing behind a seated opponent, it can also be executed on an opponent on their back, enabling a pinfall.

Other variations include squeezing either the side of the neck or the muscle in the front of the armpit, with the four fingers dug into the armpit and the thumb pressing into the front of the shoulder.

Just like the original clawhold, the attacker applies a painful nerve hold to the adversary's abdomen, forcing them to submit or pass out.

This neck crank sees the wrestler wrap both hands around the opponent's face and pull back, which applies pressure to the neck and shoulder area.

The move is performed in several ways, usually involving the wrestler trapping one of the opponent's arms. Chris Benoit 's Crippler Crossface was a variation that involved the arm trap; in the adjacent picture, he has pulled so far back that he finished the hold seated, which he did not always do.

Kenta 's LeBell Lock is performed from the omoplata position, which also puts pressure on the trapped arm.

Kenta's positioning requires him to be seated; Benoit, as noted above, performed his variation from both positions.

That move was popularized by Kenta and Daniel Bryan. It is used by Taiji Ishimori on rare occasions. Another variation is performed in a bridging position where the wrestler wraps both hands around the opponent's neck and pulls back, which applies pressure to the neck and bridges on the opponent's back for added leverage.

The wrestler goes to a fallen opponent and places the opponent's nearest arm over the wrestler's nearest shoulder before applying the crossface, where the attacking wrestler locks their hands around the opponent's chin or lower face , then pulls back, stretching the opponent's neck and shoulder.

This is a crossface combined with a scissored armbar. The attacking wrestler traps one of the prone opponent's arms in their legs, wraps the opponents other arm under the attackers shoulder, and then applies the crossface.

Britt Baker, D. D uses this move with a clawhold named the Lockjaw. Similar to a crossface, this move sees a wrestler standing above a face-down opponent.

The wrestler then crosses their opponent's arms, keeping them in place with the legs before applying the crossface. Also known as "Neck Wrench", the wrestler faces their opponent, who is bent over.

The attacking wrestler tucks their opponent's head underneath their armpit and wraps their arm around the neck so that the forearm is pressed against the throat.

The wrestler then grabs their own wrist with their free hand, crossing it underneath the opponent's armpit and chest to lock the hold in, compressing the opponent's neck.

The attacking wrestler can then arch backwards, pulling the opponent's head forward and thus applying extra pressure on the neck.

The wrestler faces their opponent, who is bent over. The attacking wrestler tucks the opponent's head underneath their armpit and wraps their arm around the head so that the forearm is pressed against the face.

From this point on the wrestler can either grab the opponent's wrist with the free hand and tucks their own head beneath the opponent's armpit and stand upright, locking in the hold, or simply throw the opponent's arm over their own shoulder and grab the opponent's thighs with the free hand.

Similar in execution and function to a front chancery, this lock is often used as a setup for a suplex. The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends the opponent backwards.

The wrestler tucks the opponent's head face-up under their armpit and wraps their arm around the head, so that their forearm is pressed against the back of the opponent's neck.

The wrestler then pulls the opponent's head backwards and up, wrenching the opponent's neck. Also commonly known as a dragon bite, this move sees the attacking wrestler behind a standing opponent, pulling them backwards into an inverted facelock and wrapping their legs around the opponent's body with a body scissors.

The attacker then arches backwards, putting pressure on the opponents neck and spine. This move is used on an opponent trapped within the ring ropes, which makes the move illegal under most match rules.

The wrestler applies an inverted facelock to a seated opponent, places their far leg between the opponent's legs, and pushes their near leg's knee against the opponent's back.

The wrestler then pulls the opponent's head backwards with their arms and the opponent's far leg outwards with their leg.

In this hold, a wrestler who is facing away from an opponent wraps their arm around the neck of an opponent.

This is also called a "reverse chancery". Though this is an often used rest hold, it is also sometimes the beginning of a standard bulldog move.

The wrestler stands in front of the opponent while both people are facing the same direction, with some space in between the two.

Then, the wrestler moves slightly to the left while still positioned in front of the opponent. The wrestler then uses the near hand to reach back and grab the opponent from behind the head, thus pulling the opponent's head above the wrestler's shoulder.

Sometimes the free arm is placed at the top of the opponent's head. The move is also referred to as a "European headlock", due to its prominence in European wrestling.

This hold is a staple of European style wrestling and technical wrestling influenced by European wrestling.

An inverted version of the cravate is used by Chris Hero as part of his "Hangman's Clutch" submissions in which the hand positioning is the same as a normal cravate but the facelock is connected around the face of the opponent, not from behind the opponent's head, thus pulling the opponent's head backwards rather than forwards, putting significant pressure on the neck by stretching it backwards and in other directions toward which the neck would not normally bend.

Also referred to as a neckscissors, this hold sees a wrestler approach a supine opponent and sit next to them before turning onto their side towards the opponent and wrapping their legs around either side of the opponent's head, crossing the top leg after it has gone around the opponent's chin.

The wrestler then tightens their grip to choke an opponent by compressing their throat. The wrestler tucks a bent-over opponent's head in between their legs or thighs.

In professional wrestling this move is used to set up powerbombs or piledrivers. The nelson hold in professional wrestling usually takes the form of the full nelson, half nelson, or three-quarter nelson.

In all three variations, the wrestler slips either one or both arms underneath the opponent's armpits from behind and locks their hands behind their neck, pushing the opponent's head forward against their chest.

For a full neslon, the attacker slips both their arms under the opponent's armpits and locks their hands behind their opponent's neck.

The half and three-quarter nelsons are usually transition holds, as they are in amateur wrestling. For the half nelson the attacker slips one arm under the opponent's armpit and places it on the neck.

The three-quarter nelson is done by performing a half nelson using one hand and passing the other hand underneath the opponent from the same side.

The passing hand goes under the opponent's neck and around the far side to the top of the neck, where it is locked with the other hand around the neck.

The full nelson, which is illegal in amateur wrestling, is often used as a submission maneuver by certain wrestlers, such as Chris Masters , as shown in the accompanying picture.

Ken Patera performed a variation he called the Swinging Neckbreaker not to be confused with the neckbreaker variation , where he would lock the hold on and lift the opponent off the ground, then swing him in the air.

There is also an inverted version where instead of performing the move from behind the opponent, the wrestler stands in front of the opponent and uses the move in the same way as the normal full nelson.

Bobby Lashley uses a variation called Hurt Lock , where he locks the nelson in and drops his opponent into a body scissors.

A variant of a nelson hold in which the wrestler applying the hold forces the opponent prone on the mat and drives their knees into the opponent's upper back.

The wrestler most wide recognized as popularizing this hold is Stu Hart. This hold is performed on an opponent who is lying face down on the mat.

The wrestler grabs one of the opponent's legs and places the opponent's ankle between their thighs. The wrestler then lies on top of the opponent's back and locks their arms around the opponent's head.

The wrestler then pulls back, stretching the opponent's back, neck, and knee. Samoa Joe , Jazz and Nikki Bella have also used this move.

Starting in the same position as a regular STF, the attacker takes both the opponent's legs, bends them at the knees, and crosses them, placing one ankle in the other leg's knee-pit.

The wrestler then grabs the free ankle and places that ankle between their thighs. They then lie on top of the opponent's back and lock their arms around the opponent's face.

The wrestler then pulls back, stretching the opponent's back, neck, and knees. Kazuchika Okada uses this move as the Red Ink.

The inverted Indian deathlock facelock, or a "Muta lock". The wrestler first takes the opponent's legs then, bends them at the knees, and crosses them, placing one ankle in the other leg's knee-pit before then turning around so that they are facing away from the opponent and places one of their feet into the triangle created by the opponent's crossed legs.

The wrestler then places the opponent's free ankle under their knee-pit and bridges backwards to reach over their head and locks their arms around the opponent's head.

Invented by The Great Muta , [9] [10] this move has been adapted and performed by various wrestlers such as Melina Perez California Dream and Tenille Dashwood Emma Lock as finishing moves, signature moves, and setups to finishers.

Short for "stepover toehold sleeper", this hold is a modified version of an STF in which the wrestler wraps their arm around the neck of the opponent in a sleeper hold instead of pulling back on the head of the opponent.

Invented by Masahiro Chono. Also known as a keylock. This armlock sees the wrestler grappling the opponent's wrist with the similar hand for example, if they uses the right arm, they would grab the opponent's right wrist , and with the opponent's wrist still clutched, the wrestler bends the opponent's arm of the grappled wrist towards or behind the opponent's head.

Then, the wrestler passes their other free arm through the "hole" formed by the opponent's bent arm under the biceps, and then catches the opponent's grappled wrist.

This would result in the opponent's arm being shaped into a 4. As the opponent's wrist is grabbed by both opponent's hands, along with the bent arm, this applies effective pressure into the opponent.

The maneuver can be executed on a standing or a downed facing upwards opponent. This move has been used by many wrestlers for many years.

The wrestler approaches an opponent lying against any set of ropes and grabs one of the opponent's wrists with their similar arm.

The wrestler then pins the arm with the grappled wrist against the second or top rope to the outside of the ring, passes their other arm from under the opponent's biceps, and grapples the opponent's wrist.

The whole maneuver would force the opponent's arm to be bent in the number "4" shape, applying more pressure as the arm is trapped between the second or top rope.

The rope-hung figure-four armlock can be also grappled through the bottom rope, if the opponent is lying against it.

Also known as a spinning armlock. The standing attacking wrestler grabs the wrist of a face down opponent, pulling it towards themselves, then steps over the opponent's outstretched arm, placing one leg to either side.

From this point, the wrestler turns degrees, simultaneously bending the arm of the opponent around the attacker's own leg.

The wrestler can over-rotate or turn again to apply more pressure on the arm. The stepover armlock is similar in execution to the spinning toe hold , except that the wrist is held instead of the foot.

The wrestler takes hold of the opponent's arm and twists it, putting pressure on the shoulder and elbow. This may sometimes be preceded by an arm wrench.

Chris Jericho popularized this move. Also known as a cross armbreaker or straight armbar. The wrestler sits on either side of an opponent who is lying either prone or supine on the mat, with the wrestler's legs scissoring one of the opponent's arms.

The wrestler then grabs hold of the wrist of that arm and pulls it upwards, causing hyper extension of the shoulder and elbow.

Wrestlers Alberto Del Rio often the flying variant, see below and Ronda Rousey perform this move a finisher. Bryan Danielson popularized and invented a variation, dubbed the Danielson Special , where he would flip his opponent with a double underhook suplex before locking in the cross armbar.

This variation begins with the wrestler standing on either side of the bent-over opponent. The wrestler then steps over one of the opponent's arms while holding that arm's wrist, and then rolls or twists their body in mid-air while holding the wrist, forcing the opponent down to their back and ending in a cross armbar.

This variant has been used by Alberto Del Rio , A. Styles and Asuka. The wrestler, situated perpendicular to and behind the opponent, holds the opponent's arm with both arms, pulling the arm across their chest.

The wrestler then holds the other arm with their legs, stretching the shoulders back in a crucifying position and hyperextending the arm.

Invented by Yoshiaki Fujiwara , it is also known as a short "armbar". The opponent's arm is then hooked and pulled back into their body, stretching the forearms, biceps, and pectoral muscles.

Variations of this can include clasping the opponent's hand instead of hooking the upper arm, for extra leverage and bridging out, while performing the move to increase leverage and immobilize the opponent.

A kneeling variation also exists. Becky Lynch uses it as the Dis-arm-her , where the attacking wrestler takes a face-down opponent's arm in a kneeling position, adding pressure by pulling back on the arm.

A reverse version also exists, with the opponent lying on their back, the wrestler lies on the mat, putting some or all of their weight on the opponent to prevent them from moving.

Timothy Thatcher uses it as his submission finisher. The wrestler grabs the wrist of the opponent so that the arm is held bent against their back, and their hand is forced upwards towards the neck, thereby applying pressure to the shoulder joint.

It is used by many wrestlers in the beginning of the match. It was used by Ed Lewis and Bruno Sammartino. The wrestler wraps their legs around the opponent's head in a headscissors , facing towards the opponent, then grabs one of the opponent's arms and wrenches it backwards, causing pressure on the shoulder and elbow of the opponent.

This can often be performed on a standing wrestler when preceded by a tilt-a-whirl , which was popularized by Gail Kim , who dubbed it the Flying Dragon.

Known in Mexico as " La Cerrajera " Spanish for "The Locksmith" , sees the wrestler approaching a prone opponent from the side. The wrestler then "scissors" clasps the near arm of the opponent with one or both legs from a standing position and takes hold of the far arm of the opponent with both hands, forcing the opponent onto their side and placing stress on both shoulder joints, as well as making it harder for the opponent to breathe.

It can cause serious injury to the opponent if held for long. Often confused for an octopus hold. The opponent is on their back with the attacker sitting beside them and grabbing the nearest arm.

The attacker bends the opponent's arm and reaches through with one of their own. The attacker places one of their legs across the wrist of the opponent and grabs their own ankle to lock the hold.

The attacker pulls up with their arm while forcing the victim's wrist down with their leg, and applies pressure to the victim's elbow.

Known in combat sport as the " bicep slicer ". The opponent begins supine, lying with their back on the bottom or second rope and facing into the ring.

The wrestler runs towards the opponent and jumps through the second and top rope while holding on to the ropes, then swings around and grapevines the opponent's arms, applying a crucifix armbar.

From behind a seated opponent, the wrestler grabs one of the opponent's elbows and pulls it up and backward. The wrestler then bends the wrist and forces the open palm of the opponent's hand into their chest, putting pressure on the wrist.

The maneuver's invention is credited to Barry Darsow , who was the person who gave it its name. The wrestler grabs their opponent's arm, pulling it around behind the opponent's back.

This stretches the pectorals and shoulder joint, and immobilizes the arm. This is a legitimate controlling or debilitating hold, and is commonly used by police officers in the United States to subdue uncooperative persons for arrest.

Also known as a bridging wrist lock. The wrestler approaches a prone opponent, lying down on their stomach.

The wrestler grabs either of the opponent's arms and pulls it to their back resulting the arm being bent behind the opponent's back.

The wrestler then rolls or flips forward into a bridge, applying pressure on the wrist and elbow. In this variation, the wrestler first performs the chickenwing to one of the opponent's arms, then takes their other arm, wraps it around the opponent's neck, and then either pulls the opponent's head to the side, which puts pressure on the neck and shoulders, or leaves the arm tucked under the chin as in a one-armed sleeper hold.

Depending on the wrestler's preference, they may clasp their hands together to secure the hold, as Triple H shows in the adjacent picture.

In many cases, the wrestler will drop to the mat and lock the opponent in a bodyscissor lock to make escape even more difficult.

The crossface chickenwing is mostly identified with Bob Backlund , who used the hold as a finishing maneuver following his comeback to the WWF in the mids and won his second world championship using the hold.

Backlund's version of the hold incorporates the bodyscissors portion. Asuka also uses this variation as a submission finisher, calling it the Asuka Lock.

Marty Scurll uses it as finishing move. This hold sees the wrestler standing behind the opponent facing the same direction, and then hooking both the opponent's arms under their armpits.

The move is known for being used for the tiger suplex. Also referred to as a "bridging grounded double chickenwing" or a "cattle mutilation".

The wrestler stands over a prone opponent's back and tucks the opponent's arms under their armpits. From this point, the wrestler then rolls or flips into a bridge, pulling the opponent's arms and applying pressure on them.

This move was invented by Atsuo Sawada and was made famous by Bryan Danielson before he went on to greater fame as Daniel Bryan.

Asuka also uses this as a submission finisher. This variation of the double chickenwing sees the wrestler wrenching the opponent up while still holding them in the double chickenwing.

The hold is usually transitioned into a chickenwing facebuster. The Elevated double chickenwing facebuster was famously used by Ricky Steamboat in his best 2 out of 3 falls match with Ric Flair.

Its facebuster version was later made popular by Beth Phoenix , renaming the move as the Glam Slam.

This technique is also known as a single chickenwing hammerlock or a double wrist lock. The move is performed when a wrestler grasps the opponent's left wrist with their right hand.

The wrestler then places their left arm over and around the opponent's arm while grasping their own wrist. This move is ambidextrous and can be performed either from a standing position, or a grounded position where the attacker applies a variation of body scissors.

This move was popularized in WWE by Brock Lesnar , where he would use it often to kayfabe break his opponent's arm. Kushida also uses the hold as the Hoverboard Lock.

Sometimes preceded by an arm wrench , the wrestler grasps the opponent's hand and twists backwards, placing pressure on the wrist.

While this can inflict pain on its own, it is most often used as a transition hold, leading into either a hammer lock, an elbow to the held arm, or kicks to the opponent's abdominal area.

Another form of wrist lock, sometimes known as a figure four wrist lock, involves the wrestler after applying the initial wrist lock with the left hand threading their right arm through the gap the two arms provide, forming a 4 , and providing leverage on the wrist lock.

A wrestler stands in front of an opponent and locks their hands around the opponent, squeezing them. Often the wrestler will shake their body from side to side in order to generate more pain around the ribs and spine.

Frequently used by powerhouse style wrestlers, this rather simple to apply hold is used by heels and faces alike. An inverted variation is also possible, which was commonly used by Big John Studd.

In both versions, one or both of the opponent's arms can be pinned to their sides. The attacker stands to the side of an opponent and locks their hands around their torso.

One or both of the arms can be pinned. A wrestler stands behind the opponent and then wraps both of their arms around them in a reverse bear hug, sometimes clutching their hands together by the wrist for added pressure.

This usually sets up a German suplex or a waistlock takedown. A wrestler approaches a sitting opponent from in front, behind, or either side.

The attacking wrestler then sits next to the opponent and wraps their legs around the opponent, crossing their ankles and then tightening their grip by squeezing together their thighs or straightening their legs to compress the opponent's torso.

This hold is often used in conjunction with a hold applied to the head or the arms in order to restrain the opponent. Also known as a "cobra twist", this hold begins with a wrestler facing their opponent's side.

The wrestler first straddles one of the opponent's legs, then reaches over the opponent's near arm with the arm close to the opponent's back and locks it.

Squatting and twisting to the side flexes the opponent's back and stretches their abdomen, which also means leaving their abs exposed and open to further holds, such as a claw to the victim's abs, or simply punching them.

This move can also be applied to a seated opponent. The amateur wrestling analogue is the guillotine , also known as a " twister ".

This typically starts with the opponent on their back, and the wrestler standing and facing them. The wrestler hooks each of the opponent's legs in one of their arms and then turns the opponent face-down, stepping over them in the process.

The final position has the wrestler in a semi-sitting position and facing away from the opponent, with the opponent's back and legs bent back toward their face.

Chris Jericho uses this move in a high angle version, calling it the Walls of Jericho. Lance Storm also performs this move with both versions, including the regular Boston crab and single-leg Boston crab.

He usually sets it up from a single-leg takedown or a roll-through called the Calgary Crab. Samoa Joe also uses an inverted powerbomb as a setup into the Boston crab.

The wrestler kneels on the opponent's back with both knees, hooking the head with one arm and the legs with the other.

They then roll back so that the opponent is suspended on their knees above them, facing up. The wrestler pulls down with both arms while pushing up with the knees to bend the opponent's back.

The Gory special is a back-to-back backbreaker submission hold. From this position, the wrestler lifts the opponent up, usually by bending.

This move can be used as a submission hold or can be used for a neckbreaker slam , or a facebuster takedown. The wrestler grabs the opponent's arms and wraps their legs on the outside of them, so the wrestler's feet meet at the back of the neck of the opponent and exert a downward pressure, akin to applying a full nelson but by using the legs.

Also known as an "Octopus stretch", the wrestler stands behind the opponent and hooks a leg over the opponent's opposite leg. The wrestler then forces the opponent to one side, traps one of the opponent's arms with their own arm, and drapes their free leg over the neck of the opponent, forcing it downward.

This elevates the wrestler and places all the weight of the wrestler on the opponent. The wrestler has one arm free, which can be used for balance.

It was invented by Antonio Inoki. The opponent is face down on the mat, with the attacker bending both of their legs up and tucking their ankles against their armpits.

The attacker then reaches down and grabs both of the opponent's arms before sitting down, "rocking" back and forth and stretching the opponent's back.

Also known as a " Romero special ". The surfboard hold first sees a wrestler stand behind a fallen opponent, who is lying stomach down on the floor.

The wrestler places one foot down just above each of the opponent's knees and bends their legs up, hooking them around their own knees; at this point the wrestler grasps both of their opponent's wrists usually slapping the opponent's back in an attempt to bring the arms in reach , and falls backwards while compressing the opponent's shoulder blades and lifting them off the ground.

This can see the wrestler fall to a seated position or go onto their back, lifting the opponent skyward, which will increase pressure on the opponent but put the wrestler in risk of pinning their own shoulders to the mat.

This version of a surfboard sees a standing or kneeling wrestler take hold of both of a kneeling or seated opponent's wrists and cross their arms over, applying pressure to both the opponent's arms and shoulders.

Sometimes the wrestler may place their foot or knee on the opponent's upper back in order to exert even more pressure. Another version of a surfboard, which is known as a "seated surfboard stretch" but referred to as a "modified surfboard stretch".

Most often applied by a standing wrestler against a prone opponent, but may also be applied by a seated wrestler or against a seated or kneeling opponent, sees the wrestler grasp both of their opponent's wrists while placing their foot or knee on the opponent's upper back, pulling back on the arms to compress the opponent's shoulder blades.

In this toe hold maneuver, a wrestler will grab the opponent's foot and lift their leg off the ground.

With one hand the wrestler will grab either the toes or the outside of the foot, then with the other wrap the ankle to create a "hole" for the joint.

A grapevine variation sees the wrestler applying the ankle lock hold and then falling to the mat and scissoring the leg of the opponent. This stops the opponent from rolling out of the move and makes it harder for them to crawl to the ropes, but lessens the pressure that can be applied.

The move can be executed from a kneeling position or a standing position, depending on the wrestler's preference.

Ken Shamrock was the first to popularize the use of this move in professional wrestling, doing his from a kneeling position. Years later, Kurt Angle adopted the ankle lock as his finisher, but would often do it from a standing position.

Also popularly known as a "Texas cloverleaf", the wrestler stands at the feet of the supine opponent, grabs the opponent's legs, and lifts them up. The wrestler then bends one leg so that the shin is behind the knee of the straight leg and places the ankle of the straight leg in their armpit.

With the same arm, they reach around the ankle and through the opening formed by the legs, and lock their hands together. The wrestler then steps over his opponent, turning the opponent over as in a sharpshooter and Boston crab and proceeds to squat and lean back.

The hold compresses the legs, flexes the spine, and stretches the abdomen. The move was invented by Dory Funk, Jr. Guerrero referred to the move as the Lasso from El Paso , making reference to his hometown.

An armlock variation of the cloverleaf that is similar to a single leg Boston crab with armlock. This hold begins with an opponent lying face up on the mat.

The attacking wrestler then seizes one of their arms and proceeds to walk over the opponent while continuing to hold the arm, forcing the opponent to turn over onto their stomach.

The wrestler then kneels down on the opponent's back, locking the opponent's arm behind their knee in the process.

The wrestler then reaches over and bends one leg so that the shin is behind the knee of the straight leg and places the ankle of the straight leg in their armpit.

With the same arm, the wrestler reaches around the ankle and through the opening formed by the legs, and locks their hands together as in a cloverleaf.

The wrestler then pulls back so as to stretch the legs, back, and neck of the opponent while keeping the arm trapped.

In this variation of a cloverleaf instead of turning around when turning the opponent over, the wrestler faces the same direction as the opponent to squat and lean forward to apply more pressure to the legs, spine, and abdomen.

Also known as the Gorilla Clutch, a body scissors version exists as well. Rhea Ripley uses a standing version called the Prism Trap.

This variation of the cloverleaf sees the wrestler, after crossing one of the opponent's legs over the other in a figure four shape, lock the over leg behind their near knee before placing the straight leg under their armpit and turning over.

The wrestler proceeds to lean back, pulling on the leg under the armpit. This keeps the over leg, now under, locked while putting pressure on the leg and stretching the legs and back.

Perkins , who calls it the Figure Four Deathlock. Invented by Chris Hero , this variation of the cloverleaf sees the wrestler hook the legs like a cloverleaf , but ten weaves their hands through to clasp their other hand and also hooks the ankle sticking out with one leg left or right into their kneepit.

Also called a straight legbar or kneebar, it is performed similarly to an armbar by holding the opponent's leg in between the legs and arms so the opponent's kneecap points towards the body.

The wrestler pushes the hips forward, the opponent's leg is straightened, and further leveraging hyper-extends the opponent's knee. Commonly used as a counter to an attack from behind.

The wrestler flips forward down on to their back, placing their legs around one of the legs of the opponent on the way down, and thus using their momentum to drop the opponent forward down to the mat.

The move can be also applied by running towards the opponent and then performing the flip when next to them. The wrestler forces the opponent to the ground and opens up the opponent's legs, stepping in with both legs.

The wrestler then wraps their legs around the head of the opponent and crosses the opponent's legs, applying pressure on them with their hands.

The wrestler next turns degrees and leans back. This hold applies pressure on the opponent's temples and calves, and compresses the spine.

The wrestler stands over the opponent who is lying on the mat face up and grasps a leg of the opponent. The wrestler then does a spinning toe hold and grasps the other leg, crossing them into a 4 hence the name , and falls to the mat, applying pressure to the opponent's crossed legs with their own.

While the hold applies pressure to the knee, it actually can be very painful to the shin of the victim. You can unsubscribe at any time.

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2 comments

  1. Kagale

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  2. Akinojar

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